GoalsOnTrack Blog

A systematic approach to achieving goals and getting results.

The Power of Repetition

By Gerard Burley

Repetition at the gym doesn’t just refer to reps or how many times you do a certain exercise. There’s a certain power in doing the same thing repeatedly.

Today’s exercise culture is based in doing different exercises a lot and the crazier and most diverse the workout, the more it sells. Especially in today’s noncommittal culture of studio and workout hopping, I constantly talk to people who tell me of weekly workout plans that consist of seven different kinds of workouts. While I love that they are moving and dedicated to their fitness, when you do seven different workouts in seven different days you’re really getting better at nothing. Read more

Three Things That Help Successful People Reach Fitness Goals

By Frank Shelton

Successful people don’t achieve their goals by chance. Nor do they possess superior skills. And they don’t make it to the top because of someone they know. Real success is earned.

That is especially true in the world of fitness. Whether you have or you haven’t reached your fitness goals, the reason is you. If you’re among those who haven’t had success at getting in better shape, losing weight or improving your health in other ways, it isn’t too late. There are things you can do to turn the tide and make your goals attainable.

Here are three things that separate successful people from those who fall short in meeting their fitness goals (or, really, any goals in life). Read more

A Marathon Runner’s Advice on How to Set Goals

By Nev Schulman

I’ve always been a very competitive person. When I set the goal to run the marathon, I set the goal to run it in three hours. So, to some extent, I was disappointed when I realized I wasn’t going to finish in time. I know that if I had been willing to commit more during training, I could have achieved my goal, but I also didn’t want to kill myself to do it. So I let the first marathon be about balance: I can run a 3:30 marathon comfortably. I learned to set realistic goals.

Read more

True Secrets to Making Your New Year Fitness Plan Stick

By Lynn Bode

While you can’t wave a magic wand and make your resolution come true, there are some easy steps to take that will make it easier to fulfill your promise to yourself.

  • Choose an attainable goal. Resolving to look like a male-model is not realistic for most of us, but promising to include daily physical activity in our lives is very possible.
  • Avoid choosing a resolution that you’ve been unsuccessful at achieving year after year. This will only set you up for failure, frustration and disappointment. If you are still tempted to make a promise that you’ve made before, then try altering it. For example, instead of stating that you are going to lose 30 pounds, try promising to eat healthier and increase your weekly exercise.
  • Create a game plan. At the beginning of January, write a comprehensive plan. All successful businesses start with a business plan that describes their mission and specifics on how they will achieve it. Write your own personal plan and you’ll be more likely to succeed as well.
  • Break it down and make it less intimidating. Rather than one big end goal, dissect it into smaller pieces. Set several smaller goals to achieve throughout the year that will help you to reach the ultimate goal. Then, even if you aren’t able to reach your final goal, you will have many smaller, but still significant, achievements along the way. For example, if your goal is to complete a 10K race, your smaller goals could be running a 5K in less than 30 minutes, adding upper and lower body strength training to increase your muscular endurance, and running 2 miles with a personal best completion time.
  • Make contingency plans: don’t assume sticking to your plan will be smooth sailing. Plan on hitting bumps along the resolution road and be prepared with specific ways to overcome them. What will keep you from skipping your workout or stop you from having a cigarette? This may mean seeking help from family or a professional, writing in a journal, etc.
  • Give it time: most experts agree that it takes about 21 days to create a habit and six months for it to actually become a part of your daily life.
  • Reward yourself with each milestone. If you’ve stuck with your resolution for 2 months, treat yourself to something special. But, be careful of your reward type. If you’ve lost 5 pounds, don’t give yourself a piece of cake as a reward. Instead, treat yourself to something non-food related, like a professional massage.
  • Ask friends and family members to help you so you have someone to be accountable to. Just be sure to set limits so that this doesn’t backfire and become more irritating than helpful. For example, if you resolve to be more positive ask them to gently remind you when you start talking negatively.
  • Don’t go it alone! Get professional assistance. Everyone needs help and sometimes a friend just isn’t enough. Sometimes you need the help of a trained professional. Don’t feel that seeking help is a way of copping out. Especially when it comes to fitness, research studies have shown that assistance from a fitness professional greatly improves people’s success rate. Limit your number of promises. You’ll spread yourself too thin trying to make multiple changes in your life. This will just lead to failure of all of the resolutions.
  • Test your flexibility: realize that things change frequently. Your goals and needs may be very different in April then they were when you made your resolution in January. Embrace change, even if that means that your resolution is altered.
  • Keep a journal: A journal helps you recognize your positive steps and makes it harder to go back to the same old habits.
  • On average only about 20% of us keep our New Year’s resolutions. Unfortunately, some of the biggest failures are found in fitness resolutions. But don’t let the statistics get you down. By following the tips above you’ll be better equipped to fall into the successful 20% category.